Staff

Professor Nick Bostrom

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Director of the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology

Nick Bostrom is Professor in the Faculty of Philosophy and Director of the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford University. He previously taught at Yale University. His current research centers on big picture questions for humanity, with foci on issues in the foundations of probability theory, scientific methodology and rationality, human enhancement, global catastrophic risks, moral philosophy, and consequences of future technology.

Daniel Dewey

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Alexander Tamas Fellow with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology

Daniel Dewey's research centres on high-impact, understudied features of the long-term future of artificial intelligence. Topics of particular interest include intelligence explosion, machine superintelligence, and AI ethics. Daniel was previously a software engineer at Google.

Personal website: www.danieldewey.net

Dr Anders Sandberg

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James Martin Research Associate

Anders Sandberg’s research at the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology centres on societal and ethical issues surrounding human enhancement and new technology, as well as estimating the capabilities and underlying science of future technologies. Topics of particular interest include enhancement of cognition, cognitive biases, technology-enabled collective intelligence, neuroethics and public policy. He has worked on this within the EU project ENHANCE, where he also was responsible for public outreach and online presence.

Dr Carl Benedikt Frey

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James Martin Research Fellow with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology

Carl is also Doctor of Economic History at Lund University, Economics Associate of Nuffield College, and Specialist Advisor to the Digital Skills Select Committee at the House of Lords. His research interests include the transition of industrial nations to digital economies, and subsequent challenges for economic growth and employment. In particular, his work focuses on technology shocks and associated impacts on labour markets and urban development.

Dr Cecilia Tilli

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Academic Project Manager with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology

Cecilia Tilli is an Academic Project Manager at the Future of Humanity Institute, currently co-managing the Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology. Her research interests cut across core areas of the Institute, including the benefits and risks of future technology, the nature and future of computational systems, the relationship between natural and artificial cognitive systems, and the development and enhancement of natural cognition.

Dr Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh

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James Martin Academic Project Manager with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology

Seán Ó hÉigeartaigh is the Academic Project Manager at the Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology, and his research interests straddle all of the Programme’s core areas. His current focus is on risks and impacts of emerging technologies, including near-term impacts of AI and robotics, biotechnology including synthetic biology and genomics, surveillance technology and existential risk.

Dr Toby Ord

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James Martin Research Fellow with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology

Toby Ord's background combines theoretical computer science with analytic philosophy. He is especially interested in how certain key future technologies may seriously affect society for good or ill, on a timescale of around thirty to a hundred years. Examples include the risks and opportunities surrounding artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, geoengineering, and nanotechnology. Toby is interested in both how these technologies could impact our future, and in what ways we could realistically steer a course to avoid the harms without sacrificing the benefits.

Professor Vincent C. Müller

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James Martin Research Fellow: Future of Computing and Cognitive Systems with the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technologies

Vincent C. Müller's research at the Oxford Martin Programme on the Impacts of Future Technology focuses on the nature and future of computational systems, particularly on the prospects of artificial intelligence. He is the coordinator of the European Network for Cognitive Systems, Robotics and Interaction (2009-2014), funded by the European Union through two FP7 projects with a total of €3.9 million funding (www.eucognition.org). Müller is also Professor of Philosophy at the American College of Thessaloniki/Anatolia College.